Living in Peace and Wisdom on our Planet

  My Profile  Log In   Register Free Now   
Living in Peace and Wisdom on our Planet Planet Thoughts Advanced       Click to see one of our videos, chosen at random from the database, along with its PlanetThought
 Try a video
Home   About   Books&Media   Resources   Contact  
   News   Quote   Review   Story   Tip   All   Blogs   News   Quotes   Reviews   Stories   Tips
Get Email or Web Quotes
or use our RSS feeds:
New Feed:  Fossil Fuel
 Full  Blog  News
Read & Comment:
A Solar Community In Isr...
'Let's You And Him Fight...
Paul Krugman's Errors An...
Why Climate Change Is An...




Most recent comments:
From Farm To Fork
A Simple List: Things We...
Can the affluent rest at...

Actions:
Bookmark the site
Contribute $
Easy link from your site
Visit Second Life
Visit SU Blog





Blog item: A World Of Plastic (Article And InfoGraphic)

    Email a Friend     See Related

3 comments, last: Aug-4-2011   Add a comment   Author: GuestWriter (Aug-2-2011)
Categories: Pollution, Sustainable Living

Portion of plastic cycle infographic – see full version at bottom, or click now for larger versionBy Zachary Shahan

Plastic — can you imagine a day without it? It has come to be a component of nearly everything we buy and use, it seems. On the one hand, plastic has made things possible that might not have been possible. On the other hand, there are a few major problems (at least) with its widespread use:

  1. It lasts longer than we can adequately comprehend.
  2. It causes harm to countless animals and fish that try to consume it or get entangled in it.
  3. Much of it contains hormone-disrupting chemicals that negatively affect humans.

With such a ubiquitous material, there are also a ton of interesting, useful, and perhaps even horrifying facts related to it. Someone recently shared a stunning and thorough infographic on plastic with me that I thought Green Living Ideas readers would enjoy. Aside from the facts about plastic's tremendous volume, the huge plastic garbage patches in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, plastic bag mountains on land, and the problems all of these things create, though, I love that this infographic is proactive and tells us how we can considerably cut our use of plastic. Before sharing the infographic, I'll just pull those out so that you are sure not to miss them:

  1. Use reusable bags, not plastic or paper.
  2. Drop the bottled water.
  3. Don't use single-use plastic packaging (buy in bulk when you can).
  4. Leave the sandwich bags on the shelf and use reusable sandwich boxes instead.
  5. Go the classy route and use silverware, not plastic-ware.
  6. Let the '90s go — go digital… no more CDs, plastic CD cases, and so on.
  7. Use a refillable dispenser for your soap and cleaning supplies.
  8. Use a nice "to-go" mug instead of cups made of plastic or styrofoam (don't even want to go into that issue).
  9. Try to buy products that don't contain hard-to-recycle plastics (when you need to buy something, that is).
  10. Better yet, find products not made of plastic at all (again, when you absolutely have to buy something).

Great tips. Don't think I could have come up with a better list.

>Portion of plastic cycle infographic – see full version at bottomFull infographic; click for larger version

lastic — can you imagine a day without it? It has come to be a component of nearly everything we buy and use, it seems. On the one hand, plastic has made things possible that might not have been possible. On the other hand, there are a few major problems (at least) with its widespread use:

  1. It lasts longer than we can adequately comprehend.
  2. It causes harm to countless animals and fish that try to consume it or get entangled in it.
  3. Much of it contains hormone-disrupting chemicals that negatively affect humans.

With such a ubiquitous material, there are also a ton of interesting, useful, and perhaps even horrifying facts related to it. Someone recently shared a stunning and thorough infographic on plastic with me that I thought Green Living Ideas readers would enjoy. Aside from the facts about plastic's tremendous volume, the huge plastic garbage patches in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, plastic bag mountains on land, and the problems all of these things create, though, I love that this infographic is proactive and tells us how we can considerably cut our use of plastic. Before sharing the infographic, I'll just pull those out so that you are sure not to miss them:

  1. Use reusable bags, not plastic or paper.
  2. Drop the bottled water.
  3. Don't use single-use plastic packaging (buy in bulk when you can).
  4. Leave the sandwich bags on the shelf and use reusable sandwich boxes instead.
  5. Go the classy route and use silverware, not plastic-ware.
  6. Let the '90s go — go digital… no more CDs, plastic CD cases, and so on.
  7. Use a refillable dispenser for your soap and cleaning supplies.
  8. Use a nice "to-go" mug instead of cups made of plastic or styrofoam (don't even want to go into that issue).
  9. Try to buy products that don't contain hard-to-recycle plastics (when you need to buy something, that is).
  10. Better yet, find products not made of plastic at all (again, when you absolutely have to buy something).

Great tips. Don't think I could have come up with a better list.

Source: Green Living Ideas (http://s.tt/12WTl)

tic — can you imagine a day without it? It has come to be a component of nearly everything we buy and use, it seems. On the one hand, plastic has made things possible that might not have been possible. On the other hand, there are a few major problems (at least) with its widespread use:

  1. It lasts longer than we can adequately comprehend.
  2. It causes harm to countless animals and fish that try to consume it or get entangled in it.
  3. Much of it contains hormone-disrupting chemicals that negatively affect humans.

With such a ubiquitous material, there are also a ton of interesting, useful, and perhaps even horrifying facts related to it. Someone recently shared a stunning and thorough infographic on plastic with me that I thought Green Living Ideas readers would enjoy. Aside from the facts about plastic's tremendous volume, the huge plastic garbage patches in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, plastic bag mountains on land, and the problems all of these things create, though, I love that this infographic is proactive and tells us how we can considerably cut our use of plastic. Before sharing the infographic, I'll just pull those out so that you are sure not to miss them:

  1. Use reusable bags, not plastic or paper.
  2. Drop the bottled water.
  3. Don't use single-use plastic packaging (buy in bulk when you can).
  4. Leave the sandwich bags on the shelf and use reusable sandwich boxes instead.
  5. Go the classy route and use silverware, not plastic-ware.
  6. Let the '90s go — go digital… no more CDs, plastic CD cases, and so on.
  7. Use a refillable dispenser for your soap and cleaning supplies.
  8. Use a nice "to-go" mug instead of cups made of plastic or styrofoam (don't even want to go into that issue).
  9. Try to buy products that don't contain hard-to-recycle plastics (when you need to buy something, that is).
  10. Better yet, find products not made of plastic at all (again, when you absolutely have to buy something).

Great tips. Don't think I could have come up with a better list.

Source: Green Living Ideas (http://s.tt/12WTl)

Source: http://greenlivingideas.com/2011/08/01/plastic-world-infographic  
Related PlanetThoughts.org reading:
  Can We Stop The Next Fukushima Times 10,000? (Sep-13-2011)
  'Sustainability' Crunch: Dropping The 'S' Bomb (Jun-29-2011)
  I Think This Is A Good Idea, At Least Where I Li... (May-13-2011)
  The Majestic Plastic Bag (Jan-27-2011)
  Recycling? What A Waste. (Oct-17-2010)
  Vegan Jelloware Re-Invents The Disposable Cup (Aug-14-2010)
  Dirty Little Secret: Who Wants To Live Forever (... (May-19-2010)
  Another Week On The Trek Toward A Drastically Ch... (Apr-6-2010)
  Vegetarianism And The Environment (Apr-4-2010)
  Edward Burtynsky - An Alternative Look At Progress (Jan-22-2010)

Click one tag to see readings related specifically to that tag; click "Tags" to see all related readings
  
^ top
Add a comment    
  Follow the comments made here? 
  (Please log in or register free to follow comments)
Comment by:  PT (David Alexander) (Aug-4-2011)   Web site
I think the easiest solution for the plastics problem is development of new materials that are just like plastics but are compostable. "Compostable" is one step better than biodegradable -- under most definitions (some of them very precise) it means the material breaks down in a reasonable time period, under reasonable conditions, into naturally occurring (non-toxic) materials that are compatible with soil.

There are compostable garbage bags, but currently they tear a little too easily. Hopefully they can be perfected pretty soon. I have used compostable plastic cups (made primarily of corn), and they were indistinguishable from plastic (but burned with a nice smell)!

A distinct goal is to reduce consumption overall, and so it is still best to carry re-usable cups or mugs, and other similar considerations that get away from our "disposable society".

Of course there are so many kinds of plastic, and their functional behaviors are so useful, that it could take a long time to find replacements. I am not in a position to know the details, other than the fact that work is going on to find replacements. If anyone has more detailed information, please comment about it here (or write an article on PlanetThoughts.org!)
  
Comment by: City Worker (Aug-3-2011)   

I found something about the scaffolding: http://www.ny1.com/content/top_stories/143685/winning-scaffold-design-provides-lift-above--movement-below. It IS made with plastic.
  
Comment by: City Worker (Aug-3-2011)   

It had never occurred to me that CDs are made of plastic. Not that I use that many, but it’s something to keep in mind. Also, I’ve seen “to go” mugs in Dunkin Donuts, where you get free refills if you return with the mug you bought from them, but I wonder if you can bring your own mug there or elsewhere, when no free refills are involved.

And yes, plastics have nice characteristics that we sometimes don’t even realize. A little while ago, my gum was slightly irritated. I found that paper cups would stick to my gum and were irritating. It hit me that disposable plastic cups wouldn’t cause that problem. But then, it also hit me that that non-disposable glass cups would also work. It got me to change to non-disposable glasses.

The other day, I was watching the news. Someone has designed this very attractive scaffolding. It doesn’t look like scaffolding at all. It looks like something you’d find in a garden, to train ivy or something. They said that they plan on using this type of scaffolding all over instead of the wooden scaffolding eyesores we currently see everywhere. At first, it sounded great, but then they mentioned that the top of the scaffolding, which you can see through, is made of polymers. I’m wondering: are they talking about plastics?.... some other material bad for the environment? I can’t imagine that a change to this kind of scaffolding would be good for the environment. Once we start using plastic for something we like, we find it hard to turn back. Maybe the scaffolding change won’t fly as well as they think it will.

  
^ top 
About author/contributor GuestWriter

PlanetThoughts.org welcomes occasional articles and opinion pieces from writers who are not regular contributors. Their contributions will be listed under the "GuestWriter" name, and additional attribution will be shown in accordance with the agreement with the original writer and source of the PlanetThought.

Visit Green Wave Email Marketing
Email Marketing for You and Your Planet


We won a Gotham Green Award for 2010, on Earth Day! Thank you Gotham Networking for this award.

See the attractive event brochure.

Recommended Sites

  Member of:
GOtham Green networking
Green Collar Economy
New York Academy of Sciences
Shades of Green Network

  PlanetThoughts
     Members/Affiliates *

Approaching the Limits
    to Growth
EcoEarth.Info
Environmental News Network
EESI.org
GreenBiz.com
GreenHomeBuilding.com
Heroin and Cornflakes
NewScientist
ScienceDaily


* Members of PlanetThoughts      
  communities on SU or MBL,      
  and blog article affiliates      

  Other Favorite Blogs
21st Century Citizen
Center for Bio. Diversity
Easy Ways to Go Green
EcoGeek
Good Bags
Opposing Views


Valid my RSS feeds


We Do Follow

ClickBlog.org



  Volunteer      Terms of Use      Privacy Policy  

Copyright © 2020 PlanetThoughts.org. All Rights Reserved.
Except for blog items by David Alexander: Some Rights Reserved.